Between Brisbane and Japan, some whimsy and Dan (All contents © Dan Ryan, unless noted)

Tokyo, people

Life at the kōban

All the wide happy and the scattering crowds,

these are which I watch over.

For I am police, I am law.

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It is good I do this,

for there is no better humble god of justice

than me when I am on duty.

In Tokyo we have guns,

yes,

for we are police and

they are subtle extensions of sword

and I see them as

metals from repurposed katana

beaten into tiny rocket-spitting machines.

Musashi used guns.

I read this once in torn manga-page literature.

To me this brings honor to the idea,

and grinds nothingness into fine subtlety.

For if you can kill disbelief,

you can kill injustice.

When this is done

my work will be over,

I will no longer need to be police.

I would like to put myself out of a job,

I would like to always go fishing

in the Sumida River

and hook all the gold rings the yakuza ever dropped into it.

It would be a good thing to be with my son every day,

to know I will never need a gun to protect him.

To never need updated training

on the best American ways to shoot people in the head.

But these times are not here yet.

So I will guard you,

and you will love me for it,

and I will love you back because you give me purpose and honor.

And money.

(Picture taken in Asakusa, Tokyo in October, 2013. Published concurrently on Scholars and Rogues.)


Old men in Tokyo are monsters of subtle beauty

I watched him. He watched me…

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Then he yawned, and the boredom spreading radially out from him was like a superhero power which placed into my mind the compulsion to walk away…

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The old men in Tokyo always catch you in the lie you tell yourself that you’ll never become one of them.

(Pictures taken at Nakano Station, Tokyo in October, 2013)


All your soft drinks to buy for the world

A cheap and well-stocked vending machine alcove on the streets of Shinjuku near Golden Gai…

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(Picture taken in Tokyo, Japan in September, 2013)


In Golden Gai

I once tripped through these lands like a god,

like the pure embodiment of all the liquor

the Allies ever drank in Tokyo.

It is quiet here now,

and the Americans are gone,

but I know these streets.

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They are masters and servants to me.

In the daytime, the vampires are hiding,

(well, most of them)

even though I know where they lay.

At night they will be back here,

disguised as young salarymen,

and high school girls in vocational school,

and tourists from Russia and France.

I will know their minds and their innocent evils,

and I will keep watching until the sun and the train schedules

drive them from the streets back to their lairs.

(Picture taken in Golden Gai in Shinjuku, Tokyo in September, 2013. Also published on Scholars and Rogues.)


Heated talk and hot air

They spoke heatedly, passionately, and didn’t seem to care who heard them.  Overall she didn’t seem happy with him and he seemed frustrated by whatever she said. But it really didn’t matter, because it was a steamy-hot September day in Shinjuku, which made all of Tokyo cranky, so nobody passing nearby paid them any attention anyway…

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(Pictures taken in Golden Gai in Shinjuku, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Shinjuku bivouac

It was a sweltering day in Shinjuku, the sort of day where the hot, heavy air doesn’t much want to move out of your way, and seems to resent it when you push it aside to pass by. Days like this in Tokyo can suck the energy out of you, and the man obviously needed a rest.

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The people passing by didn’t bother him just as he wasn’t bothering them, for the sidewalk was wide. There was an equilibrium in this, and a kindness which it is sometimes surprising that Tokyo is willing to provide…

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(Pictures taken near Shinjuku Central Park in September, 2013. Here’s a site for the park in Japanese)


Smoke the Prince

In passing, quiet moments, when tobacco takes you its lover….

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…maybe you think about all the furrows in fields you’ve never sown, all the gorgeous richness you’ll never see…

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…and you puff on a tube of leaf, it is good Tokyo leaf and came at great cost…

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…but it jackhammers into you that it won’t fill your belly, and maybe that’s okay because it is hard to care anyway.

(Pictures taken in Golden Gai, Shinjuku, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Salaryboy

The kid was young, like “Why aren’t you in school?” young. Twenty years ago I would have assumed he was, with his modest black suit and schoolboy backpack, just out of university and starting a salaryman career path with a good company. That isn’t a safe assumption in Japan anymore. Maybe that’s why the kid looks so uptight.

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(Picture taken in front of Trattoria Il Fornello, Nakano-ku, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Nobody prays in Tokyo

The edge of your seat

Is where my property line begins.

It’s crowded here in Tokyo,

A year in ghost time is one second to us.

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Since my husband retired,

And my children grew and moved away,

I don’t have anywhere to go really now.

So some days I come down here to the crosswalk.

I shuffle back and forth over it a few times,

The wide expanse of asphalt,

Just to feel how spacious this city can be.

(Picture taken at Nakano Station, Tokyo in September, 2013)


This ride is ending

It has been a shitty year.

My beloved father-in-law died, my “Tokyo Panic Stories” book is WAY behind schedule, my chronic depression got particularly aggressive during numerous week-long periods, I made a few enemies online and in the town where I live, I drank and smoked too much, I exercised too little, and during November and December my wife and I have been sharing a real mucous festival of a respiratory virus, while I developed a painful tooth abscess that recently required a root canal.

So, like the seemingly impatient man in the photograph, I can’t wait for this 2014 train to stop and the doors to slide open so I can jump the hell off of it onto the platform for 2015. And I don’t exactly know where the 2015 train is going, but I am sure I will see my 51st birthday, and the publication of “Tokyo Panic Stories”, and continued love and support from my wife, and Tokyo.

Yep, I will see those things and knowing this maintains my optimism and hope. I’m not sure of the exact how or when on Tokyo yet, but I know I will soon see those things too…

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(Picture taken on the Yamanote Line in Tokyo between Takadanobaba and Shibuya in September, 2013)


Part of my past is a hotel sidewalk where pretty girls still walk by every now and then…

When I first moved to Tokyo in mid February, 1987 I stayed in the Akasaka Yōkō Hotel. My room there was a fine little place, and I stayed in it at my company’s expense for about a month until I found my own apartment in Yushima.

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I hadn’t seen my first “home” in Japan since I moved out of it in late March, 1987. So the last time I was in Tokyo in 2013, I made a point of going to Akasaka to see the place for the first time in over 26 years. It was still nice, still monolithic and rust orange-red.

And I didn’t go inside the hotel, but I lingered in front of it for awhile and admired the occasional pretty girl passing by it like I used to do when I was a much younger man.

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(Pictures taken in Akasaka, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Evening and Ameyayokochō

I am so fond of Ameyayokochō, a place in Tokyo where I spent a lot of time in my twenties. It is so vibrant, metal blue, and beautiful, full of the street-level life and kinetic personal frenzies that are the very blood pumping through Tokyo’s many mythological hearts…

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(Picture taken in Ameyayokochō, Ueno, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Ameyayokochō time warp

Tokyo changes so rapidly. Parts of it, anyway. Although this photograph of Ameyayokochō on a Tuesday afternoon is from April, 2012, it could well have been taken in 2002. or 1992, or 1982, or….well, you get the idea.

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(Picture taken in Ameyayokochō, Ueno, Tokyo in April, 2012)


Tokyo Freedom

The tiny neighborhood bars and watering holes distributed throughout Tokyo are probably as numerous as the stars on a clear night in the Himalayas. Perversely, they’re often the kinds of places that are easy to miss, at least in the daytime, even if a given joint is open when one happens to walk by.

But sometimes one can pass a Tokyo bar, even a run-down looking place, and feel strangely drawn to it somehow. Something about it catches the eye, perhaps the way it’s painted or how the bar’s name is displayed on the street. And suddenly one finds oneself walking into the joint even if one wasn’t originally in the mood for a drink.

Freedom in Nakano 5-chome is that kind of place, an unassuming little neighborhood bar that doesn’t look like much on the outside, but had an allure that made going inside an unexpected but rich Tokyo experience…

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Freedom is on the eastern edge of Nakano 5-chome, near a place called Kitano Shrine. The combination of its severely-faded blue color, arched window, and the liquor bottles on the curb made the building stand out.

 

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The katakana and phone number were missing from the front of the building, revealing the more vibrant color the place used to be and begging the question as to whether Freedom was actually still named Freedom.

 

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But once inside, the outside didn’t matter much. Even to a foreigner with very limited Japanese, the folks in Freedom were warm and welcoming. Mama-san, the owner, is the lady laughing.

 

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One of her customers, a garrulous and inquisitive older fellow, was quick with questions in limited English about California. And with the universal sign that he was Japanese and posing for a picture.

 

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Mama-san showed obvious pride in her place, and it showed in the service she provided.

 

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As to the interior of Freedom, it was like being in an artist’s teeny world where the artist serves up booze as a way of saying thanks for visiting.

 

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With the front door open and light from an overcast sky seeping through it and the window, Freedom had a comfortable, glowing beauty within that a photograph almost can’t convey.

 

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Mama-san enjoyed her place and her customers. One got the impression that her customers were more than regulars, but friends on whom she relied not only for income, but also for a reason to even own and run a bar in the first place.

 

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Along almost an entire wall there was a more fiery interpretation of Mount Fuji than one typically sees. It was obviously Freedom’s visual centerpiece.

 

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Even while relaxing with a beer, Mama-san paid warm attention to everyone in her bar, even those shooting flash pictures while barely being able to speak Japanese.

 

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Freedom had little artistic flourishes almost everywhere, from the walls…..

 

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….to the various objet d’art which contributed to Freedom’s quirky beauty.

 

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But the true quality of a Tokyo bar begins and ends with the people one meets there. And judging by the folks at Freedom, it was a rather exceptional place.

 

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Freedom is the kind of place one is glad to have found, and feels reluctant to leave. Freedom and the little places like it throughout Tokyo are showcases for the kind of hospitality for which the Japanese are famous, and for their often-overlooked friendliness and warmth.

In a sense, one hasn’t really discovered Tokyo, or Japan, until one finds one’s own kind of Freedom.

(Photographs taken in Nakano 5-chome, Tokyo in September, 2013. Published concurrently on Scholars and Rogues. In addition, I am proud to say Japan Subculture Research Center published a shorter version of “Tokyo Freedom” on Christmas Day, 2014.)


Tokyo Gone Street

No big deal

just the passing of time

and a flesh suit

going for cigarettes

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while I hang back and watch.

Normally I’m the ghost in him.

But today he left me behind

so that I could watch the street

and then

when he gets back

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I will once again

meld my ghostly membranes to his meat frame

so I can make him remember who he is

and we can be whole again.

(Pictures taken in Sanya (Kiyokawa 2-chome), Tokyo in September, 2013)


There’s just life all around it

Vice is stationary, and those living life are free to stop or pass by it as they please….

I don’t really go in for pachinko. I love the machines (I wish I owned one), but I think the game itself is pretty boring. Nevertheless this pachinko joint, part of the Kokusai Center chain in Tokyo, has always been a welcome sight to me. The streets around it always bustle with life, and when I see it I know I am close to the temporary home I periodically rent in Tokyo…

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(Pictures taken in Nakano 5-chome, Tokyo in late September and early October, 2013)


Fishing in Tokyo

One day in Tokyo, I decided to walk from Sanya (Nihonzutsumi) to Tokyo Skytree. To do that, I had to cross a bridge from Taitō-ku into Sumida-ku, specifically Mukōjima. Well on the way there I discovered a fishing pond, and it was one of most surreal and odd things I’ve ever encountered in Tokyo…

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(Pictures taken in Mukōjima, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Tokyo is my happy place

My father-in-law died recently. His memorial was only a few days ago. And while I was editing some photos of that event, I decided I needed a mental break and began looking at some of my photographs of Tokyo. This is just a natural instinct to me. And it is very comforting to know that the happy place to which I look for comfort in my mind remains a real place to which I will one day return.

But for now, this brief photo tour of Nakano Ward, where I find even the mundane to be lovely, will have to do…

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(Pictures taken in Nakano-ku, Tokyo in mid-September, 2013)


The Nakano Broadway

A place in Tokyo that I really love. Everything around it is vibrant and colorful and full of the life we always think of when our own lives are dreary, dull, and not fulfilling our expectations…

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(Picture taken in Nakano-ku, Tokyo in September, 2013)


Noriya Takeyama is a very cool guy

Noriya Takeyama is a Japanese toy and graphics designer. I was lucky enough to meet him in October, 2013 at the Fewmany pop-up shop at the Marui Annex in Shinjuku. He and his buddy in the porkpie hat came by to say hello to the Devilrobots, with whom Takeyama-san is friends. I didn’t get to hang out with Takeyama-san for very long, but he gave off this very cool vibe and I’m really glad I got a picture with me, him, and his pal in it.

And all these months later it just occurred to me that I’m an idiot for not asking the man to autograph a sheet of stickers I had with me that he designed….

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(Photographs taken at Marui Annex, Shinjuku, Tokyo in October, 2013)

 

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Shinjuku shoeshine man

I took about 70 photographs last year of men of the street in Shinjuku. And to put this in the least acerbic terms possible, of the eight different men I photographed over the course of a month this shoeshine man was the only one who was doing something upstanding and productive. Granted, I didn’t go to Shinjuku to shoot pictures of upright, normal citizens, but I want to make a public note of the respect I have for this old fellow. Sitting outside the world’s busiest train station and trying to make a living shining shoes can’t be an easy life.

Also I have to freely admit this fellow reminds me of an old Tokyo song, which I first heard in the ‘70s in the motion picture “M*A*S*H”…

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(Picture taken on the west side of Shinjuku Station in September, 2013)


The Devilrobots are superior gentlemen

During each of my trips to Tokyo in 2012 and 2013 to take photographs for my “Tokyo Panic Stories” project, I met up with some really wonderful people, people with whom I hope to remain friends for years to come. But during the 2013 trip, a particular treat for me was the opportunity to hang out with Shinichiro Kitai and Kotohiro Nishiyama of the Tokyo-based toy and graphic design firm Devilrobots. I have been a huge fan of the Devilrobots ever since I stumbled across their To-fu Oyako character toys on eBay in 2002. Their whimsical, anthropomorphic designs for toy figures and other colorful objects really appeal to something deep within in my senses of aesthetics and fun.

In short, and without being too gushy about it, the Devilrobots are personal heroes of mine, and their work adds a LOT of joy to my life. In fact, it’s fair to say the Devilrobots inspire me in a way that has helped me cope with my chronic depression.

I met these fine gentlemen one afternoon while they were setting up the Devilrobots “Devil Museum” retrospective and retail sale displays at the Fewmany pop-up shop in the Shinjuku Marui Annex. And the rest of the afternoon just flowed from there…

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Mr. Kotohiro Nishiyama, Koto-san, the Devilrobots’ business manager who also acts as the English translator for public events. I got to hang out with Koto-san in 2012 at the Devilrobots’ offices in Shinjuku. Here at the 2013 Fewmany shop, he showed me the “Devil Museum” and the various artifacts from Devilrobots’ 17-year history.

 

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The man himself, Mr. Shinichiro Kitai (Shin-san), the Devilrobots founder and lead designer and artist. He designed pretty much every toy and graphic element you see in these photographs. And he is as colorful, whimsical, and fun as the things he creates.

 

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A display showcasing prototypes and mock-ups of some of the very first To-fu Oyako kubrick figures designed by Shin-san and manufactured by Medicom Toy. Other items in the display utilize To-fu Oyako design elements.

 

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A closer look at some Devilrobots kubrick prototypes. Note the To-fu Oyako figure in the background shaped like a “Toy Story” alien.

 

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Koto-san pointing at a display case full of Evirob kubrick figures and small sculptures. Evirob is Shin-san’s other major character design, but the character itself is a bit odd and hard to explain, mostly because I don’t fully understand it (even though I like it).

 

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One of the neatest things on display, a mashup statue of toy designer Kenny Wong’s Molly character and Shin-san’s To-fu Oyako. I wish I could have purchased this, but I had to be scrupulous with my Kickstarter funds.

 

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Koto-san and Shin-san taking a moment to evaluate their display work. Shin-san is, as you can see, not camera-shy.

 

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A multitude of Devilrobots stickers and badges, manufactured by Facto, a Japanese design company which produces various goods for toy and graphic designers like Devilrobots.

 

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After the work was done setting up the Devilrobots “Devil Museum” shop, Koto-san and Shin-san offered to take me out for some beers. Shin-san and I waited out in the rain in front of Marui Annex while Koto-san was busy retrieving the umbrella he had forgotten inside the building.

 

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We made our way to joint called 82 Ale House in Shinjuku 3-chome. After Shin-san bought the first round of pints, he was kind enough to autograph some Devilrobots items I had with me. Here he’s inscribing a booklet he designed for a CD by an excellent J-pop band called Tokimeki Express.

 

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Beers, smokes, peanuts, and a signed hand-decorated To-fu Oyako kubrick on a greasy bar table. To me this is one version of heaven.

 

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As I noted earlier, Shin-san is not camera-shy.

 

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Despite having to translate between me and Shin-san, Koto-san was able to relax.

 

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I felt so honored that these busy guys…

 

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…took the time to hang out with me.

 

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The list of things for which I am a gushing fanboy is very, very short, but the Devilrobots’ design work and these two superior gentlemen are certainly on it. One of the greatest open secrets about the Japanese is that they are very warm, big-hearted people if you make the effort to get socially close them. Shin-san and Koto-san are two perfect examples of this. I really treasured their company that rainy afternoon in Shinjuku, and I hope they enjoyed mine.

And I can’t thank these two gents enough for their warmth, hospitality, and generosity. Take care, boys, and I hope to see you the next time I’m in Tokyo.

–Dan Ryan, Brisbane, California, July 22nd 2014.

Post script: On my birthday this past January, Shin-san created this digital birthday card and posted it on my Facebook wall, convincing me that he is even more of a big-hearted mensch than I already thought he was…

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(Photographs taken at Marui Annex and 82 Ale House, Shinjuku, Tokyo in October, 2013)


Yushima walkies

It was a beautiful September day in Yushima, near the apartment complex where I lived in the ‘80s. I was standing on a street corner midway between Yushima Tenjin and Yushima Station, and this stylish lady walks by with her teeny dog, and that’s basically the whole story…

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(Picture taken in Yushima, Tokyo in September, 2013)


DAN, seriously

It was a clothing store in the Ameyayokochō district in Ueno in April or May of 1988. I got my father to shoot this photo for two reasons: the obvious name of the shop; and memories of David Byrne’s big suit in the movie “Stop Making Sense”, which I’d seen in a South Street movie theater in Philadelphia four years before.

I went back to look for this shop twenty years later when my wife and I were on a 10-day vacation in Tokyo, but it was long, long gone. The memories and this picture remain, though.

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(This image looks crummy because Costco does a rotten job of digitizing old Kodachrome slide images.)